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Andrew Murphy
05/18/2010 17:01

He believed that the Indians were inferior, and he made them leave. Because he made them leave, I think that he thought he was just better than anyone because he was the president. He thought that he could do anything he wanted.

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double
12/10/2013 09:15

d

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Ruben
05/18/2010 23:49

He beleived that even though Native Americans lived day to day lives with white,they were not considered equal. Also,he believed as president, he could do what he wanted with his inferiors. A example of this is the Indian Removal Act,where he moved thousands of Native Americans without the surpreme courts approval.

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Cimone
05/19/2010 11:51

When he decided on his own that the Native Americans didn't belong in the United States this showed much of what he thought of his presidential power. If made the cause of his presidency appear as a fraud. Equal treatment for all is a right that is given to each American by the Constitution. Did it ever say "unless you are a Native American"? Every United States president should follow the United States Constitution. Andrew Jackson was not an exception.

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Cimone
05/19/2010 12:18

The issue of the Native American policy that Andrew Jackson wanted passed had to go through the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court rightly sided with the Native American people. However,Andrew Jackson completely ignored the ruling of the Supreme Court and forced the Native Americans to leave their homeland. This really shows an unjust side of Andrew Jackson. It looked as if he thought that the power of the presidency could outweigh the power of the Judicial Branch. The United States government believed in democracy, not a tyranny.

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Andrew Bates
05/19/2010 12:24

Andrew Jackson's presidency is mainly remembered by this one Indian Removal Act. President Jackson showed the nation that he would not stop to use this presidential power for his own desires. The Cherokee nation had been assimilating to the white settlers, yet Jackson placed them under Georgia jurisdiction which was known to want the Indians gone. He had gone against the Supreme Court's decision, that stated the Cherokee would be allowed to stay on their Georgian land. Through this Andrew Jackson showed that he believed the president has absolute power.


I think Andrew Jackson might have thought he was doing the right thing. He believed this so strongly it this, that he thought the Supreme Court was going against the good of the nation. He decided to go against the decision, so he gave the Indians up to the Georgia government to decide.

Sources: my mind, textbook, and http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/283420/a_negative_view_of_jacksons_presidency.html

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Cimone
05/19/2010 12:26

The Cherokees were not happy with the relocation plan and resisted being forced to move. In 1831, the Cherokees turned to the courts for defense against the Indian Removal Act and against the Georgia Legislature’s nullification of Cherokee laws. Three times their cases went to the Supreme Court. In Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that the Cherokee had “an unquestionable right” to their lands, but that they were "not a foreign state, in the sense of the Constitution" but rather a “domestic, dependent nation” and so could not sue in a United States court over Georgia’s voiding their right to self-rule. Although this was a blow to the Cherokee case against Georgia, it cast doubt on the constitutionality of the Indian Removal Act.
http://www.montereyinstitute.org/courses/US%20History%20I/course%20files/multimedia/lesson29/lessonp.html?showTopic=2

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Cimone
05/19/2010 12:29

In backing Georgia against the Supreme Court, President Jackson was responding to pressures in several different areas. Political pressure to open Indian lands to white settlement had been mounting for some time. With increasing conflicts of interest between settlers and Indians came an ever-greater likelihood of violence not only for the Cherokees but for all Native Americans living east of the Mississippi. In addition, Jackson believed in states’ rights and wanted to limit federal power, including the power of the Supreme Court. He was also understandably concerned with the dangers inherent in granting political autonomy to groups of people wanting to establish separate laws and governments that could supersede the laws and government of a state. For these reasons he was at odds with Marshall’s Court, which felt obligated to uphold the provisions of the treaties that had already been made with the Indians. Jackson made no effort to obscure the fact that while the Court might rule whatever it pleased, the executive branch was not constrained to follow the ruling.
http://www.montereyinstitute.org/courses/US%20History%20I/course%20files/multimedia/lesson29/lessonp.html?showTopic=2

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Ruben
05/19/2010 12:30

Jackson believed in getting his way. He was planning on removing the Native Americans with, our without the Supreme Court's approval. To The Native Americans, Andrew Jackson was called "sharp knife". Andrew Jackson felt that he could do what he want maily for two reasons:

1. He thought of Native Americans as inferior.

2. He thought because he was president,he could do what was right and felt that he knew what was best.

http://www.historynet.com/andrew-jackson-and-the-indian-removal-act.htm

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Ruben
05/19/2010 12:32

In my opinion, I believe that Andrew Jackson was a cocky person. In the video we saw about him,we could clearly see that Andrew Jackson wanted his way or the highway. I believe that the Indian Removal act showed the grasp of power that Andrew Jackson felt he had over everyone.

Personal opinion.

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03/23/2011 02:14

There is no rose without a thorn.

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03/10/2012 13:04

i had 2 do an essay on the native american removal my personal opinion is.......... WHAT A JERK HE IS..... personal opinon

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