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Cimone(:
4/11/2010

#9
Battle of Shiloh
Date: April 6-7, 1862

Location: Tennessee
Confederate Commander: Albert Sidney Johnston/ P. G. T. Beauregard
Union Commander: Ulysses S. Grant
Confederate Forces Engaged: 40,335
Union Forces Engaged: 62,682
Winner: Union
Casualties: 23,741 (13,047 Union and 10,694 Confederate)

http://www.civilwarhome.com/Battles.htm

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Andrew Murphy
4/12/2010

Though the Union won the battle, they suffered the most casualties. Union casualties were 13,047 (1,754 killed, 8,408 wounded, and 2,885 missing); Confederate casualties were 10,699 (1,728 killed, 8,012 wounded, and 959 missing or captured). Even though the Union had more casualties, both sides greatly suffered. The Battle of Shiloh was said to be the bloodiest battle ever on American soil.

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Andrew Murphy
4/12/2010

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Shiloh#Aftermath

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Ruben
4/13/2010

i Believe that each side took signifcant losses on each side. The death total for each side were

Union: 13,000 out of 65,000

Confederate: 11,000 out of 41,000.

If I had to choose which side i believe came out worse it would be the Confederate sides. These are my reasons for believing so.

1. They were forced to retreat

2. Even though they lost less soilders,they had fewer soilders to begin with which makes it worse.


Textbook, Brain

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Cimone :)
4/13/2010

The battle of Shiloh was one of the most bloody battles during the civil war, taking place in Tennessee, won by Ulyssees S. Grant. The Confederacy lost 11,000 men and the Union lost 13,000. Despite this, the Union gained control of a important Confederate territory and Grant continued to advance towards the Mississippi and the Confederacy feared that it would be split in two. Everyone was horrified at the slaughter on the battle field. Even though the Union had the most casualties, I believe that the Confederacy came out in the worst conditions because they lost a major terrirory and Grant was able to get closer to the Mississippi. This would eventually lead to the blockade on the Mississippi River.

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Cimone
4/13/2010

-The History Book!

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Andrew Bates
4/22/2010

In the battle of Shiloh I think the Confederates were affected greater, because they lost around 26% of their men to fight, whereas the Union, for lack of a better word, only lost 20%, and the Confederates had 20,000 less men in the first place.

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Andrew Murphy
4/22/2010

I guess that this could go either way. The Confederate side lost, but the Union had more casualties. This is my opinion. If someone asked me who suffered more casualties, I would say it depends. If they are talking about land or victory/loss, I would say Confederate. If they were talking about Casualties, I would say Union.

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Ruben
4/22/2010

Well, for my person opinion, i believe that the confederate side took a much greater loss. After just losing a battle, they were forced to yet again fight in anothe battle, with already wounded and/or tired soilders.

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Cimone
4/22/2010

The night of the Battle of Shiloh, there was a terrible thunderstorm. Lightning lit up the battlefield, where dead and dying soldiers lay in the water in mud. During the night, Union ferried fresh troops to Grant's camp. Grant led an attack at dawn and forced exausted Southern troops to retreat. Describing the piles of mangled bodies, Gerneral Sherman says, 'The scenes of this battlefield would have sured anybody of war.' People were horrified at the slaughter."
-American History Book

In the battle of Shiloh, I think that both sides came out on the wrong side in terms of casualties. Many people died and it was a horrifying battle scene. Members of Congress even urged Lincoln to fire Grant because of the numbers of casualties. The Battle of Shiloh is known as one of the most bloody battles in Civil War history and American history.

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Ruben
4/22/2010

In war, noone wins, everyone loses. A week of non-stop is one week to much. I believe that both sides came out badly. Seeing your friends, your comrades, die, get shot, right besides you is unbareable. "Although a soldier by profession, I have never felt any sort of fondness for war, and I have never advocated it, except as a means of peace." - Ulysses S.Grant

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Cimone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
4/22/2010

One of the most significant parts of the battle was the Union's early morning assault on the Confederate's army. The night before they had shipped in new and ready troops to finish off the rest of the Confederate troops. But in a way this shows how much perserverance the Confederates showed. They didn't just give up and leave early.
The side that I believe came out of the battle of Shiloh in the worst condition was the Confederate army.

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Ruben
4/22/2010

Shiloh's first day of slaughter also witnessed the death of the Confederate leader, General Johnston, who fell at mid-afternoon, struck down by a stray bullet while directing the action on the Confederate right. At dusk, the advance division of General Buell's Federal Army of the Ohio reached Pittsburg Landing, and crossed the river to file into line on the Union left during the night. Buell's arrival, plus the timely appearance of a reserve division from Grant's army, led by Major General Lewis Wallace, fed over 22,500 reinforcements into the Union lines. On April 7, Grant renewed the fighting with an aggressive counterattack"

This is a documentary piece that leads me to believe that the confederate side were in worse conditions in the battle.

http://www.civilwarhome.com/shilohdescription.htm

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Andrew Bates
4/22/2010

I think the battle of Shiloh not only affected the numbers of both side, but also greatly the morale on both side. I think that although both side were affected the Confederates were worst off at the end of the battle. The Union lost many men, but that was countered by the fact that at the end of the road, they forced the Confederates to retreat and were able to move further the goal of Richmond and the end of the war. The Confederates lost about a fifth of the men they had fighting at the battle and ended up having to retreat and give up crucial ground. I think the resentment the soldiers had to have felt towards their leaders for making so many friends and comrades die, then turning and running from what they died to protect, would have greatly affected the rest of the war greatly against the South. Soldiers would question their commanders, not obey orders, turn deserter, or subtly help the spread of resentment throughout the army. Overall I think the South was worse off after the battle of Shiloh.

My brain, textbook

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